Ebook Presented Digitally

The ebook is a digitally presented format of any printed conventional book which can be read through a personal computer or through a hardware device called a book reader. The inception of such an innovative idea dates back to 1971 when the pioneer Michael Hart, in U.S.A., decided to create through computers storage, retrieval and scanning of texts available in libraries. This resulted in the origin of the first ebook, a copy of the `Declaration of Independence` which later evolved into `Project Gutenberg`. Today it contains over 20,000 free texts and over 100,000 books.

Every month over 3,000,000 books are downloaded. Ultimately this reached mammoth proportions with ebooks flooding the web because of its easy storage on hard drive or disk. Production of ebooks is carried out generally by document scanning or by using robotic book scanners.

Initially the ebooks were confined to specialty topics which were documents, technical manuals or articles on manufacturing techniques with cutting edge hardware. Such ebooks did not create much impact in the market as there was no consensus on packaging, selling or reading. A number of diverse specifications, supported by leading software companies or by independent programmers, proliferated which catered to readers following multiple formats resulted in further fragmentation of the market. At this stage ebook was not a mainstream item.

This, however, did not stop ebook from spreading its domain. It surfaced in the underground markets wherein the ebook publishers distributed those books which were not readily available in the market. Similarly, authors whose books did not find any publishers started offering their books on-line so that viewers were exposed to the literature. Even unauthorized and unofficial catalogues were available in various web sites. And in this manner ebooks began to circulate on-line. Romantic novels were the first successful ebooks as they catered to a large clientele who bought them on-line and enjoyed reading them in privacy.

These incidents caught the attention of major publishers. Around mid June 2001, the acclaimed publishers started delving into this medium and tried to gain from the ebook formats. This led the publishers to establish on-line stores and partnerships with e-reader manufacturers. Today, the electronic hardware manufacturers are also working in tandem with ebook readers to capitalize on the on-line ebook market.

This upsurge of activity by the reputed publishers, electronic companies and independent operators resulted in the development of new selling models. Simultaneously, a more simple and homogeneous format with better reading hardware was created to achieve a global distribution for ebooks. This has unleashed an array of new publishing houses. Today, electronic manufacturers are wooing the ebook readers through new designs while software engineers are developing new reader application for portable electronic gear ranging from hand held computers, smart phones and game consoles.

The twentieth century readers, unaware of the concept of ebook, are now being gradually exposed to this electronic phenomenon. Commuters read ebooks on laptops, hand held computers or on cell phones. Such is the craze of ebooks in Japan that mobile phone novels have evolved where books could be downloaded and read on the cell screen. Sales which were negligible a few years back has crossed 10 billion yens annually (The Economist). At present, consumers can easily access books of their choice ranging from best sellers to new authors or which ever type suiting their reading pattern.

Ebooks reading are advantageous as it is a space saving device of book storage. One CD / DVD can, approximately, store 500 ebooks and are never out of print, which is a common occurrence in conventional books. For researchers such digitized versions are ideal as they display excellent choice of formats enabling speedy cross references. Readers can adjust their reading convenience by adjusting fonts and text sizes and use back lit facility which allows adequate visibility in low light. Unlike traditional books and paperbacks, ebooks need not be hand held, can be reproduced cheaply and are generally inexpensive as it does not consume paper, ink and other resources used in conventional printing.

The basic disadvantage of ebook is that it requires electronic devices for display. The software may not be readily available or free or compatible with the existing computer configuration. Sudden hard disk drive failure or power disruption causes disturbing interruptions. eBook storage mediums are fragile, the devices are costly and replacement charges could be prohibitive. Finally, and particularly for some publishers, hacking is a perennial danger.

The Art of Persuasion and Negotiation – 3 Useful Tips to Get What You Want From People

The art of persuasion and negotiation is a much-coveted skill. For hundreds of years, humankind has been using these skills to survive. The ancient Greeks negotiated with their neighboring lands all the time. Leaders of different nations always send ambassadors to settle peace negotiations. Traders of both the old and the new world use their powers of persuasion to sweeten their deals.

If you look at today’s environment, the art of persuasion and negotiation has only become more relevant. The most successful people in the world know this all too well. By reading this article, you, too, can learn how to channel their powers of persuasion and negotiation.

1) Knowledge is power.

In the art of persuasion and negotiation, knowledge is very crucial. How much you know determines the extent of your power over the other. Before attempting a negotiation, you have to know everything there is to know about the people you’ll be speaking with.

Find out what their weaknesses are, what they want, how much they are willing to put out, etc. Knowing all these can help you come up with better points for arguments and negotiations. You’ll have an easier time persuading people to see things your way as well.

2) Establish common goals.

When dabbling in the art of persuasion and negotiation, you must remember that both parties should benefit from the deal. As much as possible, make the deal a win-win situation for everyone.

One way to cinch such collaborations is by establishing common goals – goals that are in line with you and your prospect’s plan. Doing this gives the client a sense of solidarity, which will make them more agreeable to whatever it is you’re cooking up.

3) Try the grassroots approach.

Gone are the days when you don’t care about the person you’re negotiating with over the phone. The grassroots strategy is once again earning popularity.

Instead of treating your clients like cash cows, try to develop a certain relationship with them. Ask about their family or their dreams every once in a while. The grassroots approach requires you to relate with the people you’re trying to persuade or negotiate with. Drop your high and mighty attitude and start knocking on doors.

The art of persuasion and negotiation has long been practiced. Anybody can try the different strategies one step at a time. Try it on your parents, your friends or the local shopkeepers in your town.

Withholding Your Catalog Until the End of Your Home Party Presentation

When I was doing home parties, I kept my catalogs out of sight until the shopping portion at the end of the evening. It increased my sales and made it easier to hold the attention of my guests during my parties. When I train this concept now, often times I’ll get the protest that guests need the catalogs because they need to be able to see the items that the representative doesn’t have with them as a part of their display. That’s when I counter with this question:

“Have you ever read to a group of 1st graders?”

You know how, after you read the words, you turn the book around and slowly move it from right to left so everyone of their sweet little faces can see the pictures? If so, you know how to use your catalog during your presentation. Not by handing them out and having your guest’s noses in them all night, but by talking about the items on the page and then showing them the pictures and having them write down the page number on their wish list for closer inspection later on when you do give them a catalog.

Why should it matter if they have a catalog during your presentation (besides the aforementioned lack of attention on you)? Well, consider this: if your guests have a catalog in their lap throughout your presentation, they feel confident that they’ll remember what they like when it’s time to order. Chances are, there are dozens of pages and hundreds of items in your catalog, so remembering what they specifically like at the end of your party isn’t as easy as it might seem.

Consider giving your guests a wish list instead of a catalog at the beginning of your parties. This idea might seem strange, but let me explain. A wish list is simply a place for them to write down anything they like. They’re not committed to buy anything they write down, they’re just keeping track. If all they have is a wish list, which is simply a list with spaces to write down the names, catalog page numbers and prices of what they like, they’ll be keeping track, as you go through your party, of the items they like most (because without a catalog, they’re afraid they’ll forget what they like, so they are more likely to write it down).

More importantly, this tool is like having a window into their brains, because as you sit down to support them with placing their order, you can look and see exactly what they liked. Can you see how this might support you in getting not only bigger orders, but bookings as well? (“Wow, Brenda, you have ten items on your wish list. I don’t want you to have to pay for all these items! Let’s do a party so you can earn some of this for free!”)

There’s no way you can have this conversation if all they’re using is a catalog. Get it? So wait until the end of your party (when you know they’re ready to shop) and then hand out the catalogs. And use your catalogs just like a copy of “Green Eggs and Ham” in front of a room of 1st graders.